What’s the tool/framework/technique you cannot imagine working without?

I’m going to go with prettier.

I actually cannot imagine going back to manually formatting the code. I get to focus on delivering software, not pressing TAB X times etc.

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I think codesandbox.com is up there for me. It’s an integral part of my workflow for testing ideas and playing with code in a practical frictionless way.

In a similar fashion, I also really love node (and ruby) scripts locally for automation, playing around, and building small tools for myself.

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I have a list actually.

Tools:

  • VIM and Tmux it allows me to have multiple session for multiple projects, all in one window
  • nodejs

and my Ultimate Hacking Keyboard

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Parcel has been lovely for putting together vanilla demos (and then quickly commit/push to github and have a codesandbox I can share)

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I keep hearing about Parcel and have never touched it. Happen to have anything handy for getting started? Probably the docs I guess lol :wink: https://parceljs.org/

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So, I have a parcel template (that works with codesandbox) that I “clone” (using degit) whenever I want to make a demo. I fire it up locally with confidence that I can share it on codesandbox later.

It all comes together in this zsh script I put together. So all I do from my terminal is:

+vanilla my-project

+vanilla(){
  cd ~/projects
  degit johnlindquist/vanilla-template "$1"
  cd "$1"
  git init
  git add .
  git commit -m "🎈"
  git create
  git push -u origin master
  pnpm install
  code . -g src/index.js
  pnpm start
}
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I am so picky about coding style, especially as JS has grown and there becomes more and more ways to do things. I remember before we had tools like eslint, prettier, jslint, jshint, etc you’d have a document somewhere that would list the guidelines and everyone was supposed to remember them. I would go nuts working on a code base with multiple people if we didn’t have the guard rails tools like eslint give us. And I love the plugin system so you can just keep adding and customizing what you want to have enforcement around.

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For me that’s VS Code. There’s so much support and plugins for it out of the box. It’s amazing that an IDE like that is free, open source and people publishing plugins for it. It really increased my development environment and brought more comfort, coming from terminal Vim where I had to install extensions for correct syntax colors for each language…

Besides that there are a lot of open source tools I love. From the most common like e.g. Git, that people probably don’t even think about working without anymore, to more non-popular tools like NightOwl which makes my OS and (most of) apps switch between light and dark mode automatically.

Then there’s also the small amount of tools I pay for:

  • Bear, a notes app with inline markdown support (add Vim support to this tool and it’s the best ever :p)
  • Sizzy, a browser for rapidly testing responsiveness across multiple devices. Also useful for quickly taking screenshots of multiple devices.
  • Egghead, from all education platforms I feel like this one has the most advanced content (and I frikkin’ luuuuuv the artwork/tutorial icons)

Text Editor: VS Code
Terminal/Shell: Git Bash for Windows in hyper ( with a self customised prompt that shows git status and folder details)

Also my collection of bash aliases [I can live without them but I would really really miss them]